Program details

The Master study programme is divided into four semesters of 30 ECTS each.

The EMIMEP Consortium releases joint and multiple degrees and recognises any teaching module attended in other institutions of the Consortium. Students will receive a joint/Multiple diploma from each institution in which they will have spent at least 1 semester of study.

 

UNILIM Master Physique appliquée et Ingénierie physique/Master in Applied Physics and Physical Engineering

UNIBS Master in Communication Technologies and Multimedia

UPV/EHU Master in Ingeniería física (EMIMEO Masters Degree)

FSUJena Master of Science in Photonics – M.Sc. Photonics

Taught course units

Pre-requisites

  • Linear analogue circuits, Resistive and reactive circuits- energy -dissipated power

  • Transient and steady-state conditions

  • Low pass – high pass –band pass filters – transfer functions –Bode diagram

  • Voltage and current sources – Thevenin – Norton

  • Bipolar and field effect transistors – small signal equivalent models

  • Input-output impedances.

  • Voltage-current and power gains. Static and dynamic load lines.

Module Aims 

To provide students with an understanding of nonlinear electronics and design of active power circuits, oscillators and mixers at microwave frequencies.

Learning Outcomes 

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of nonlinear modelling of microwave transistors

  • Know the main figures of merit of transistor technologies

  • Understand the nonlinear analysis applied to active microwave circuits

  • Explain and discuss the main architectures for high-efficiency power amplifiers, oscillators and mixers

  • Use the vector network analyser and suitable test benches for the characterisation of non-linear microwave components

  • Knowledge of  methodologies for the study of non-linear circuits and ADS software

  • Design linear and nonlinear circuits of RF front end with suitable criteria for power, efficiency and linearity specifications. 

Indicative Content

  • MMIC technologies for non-linear active circuits ( Si –GaAs –GaN –InP)

  • Non-linear modelling techniques of microwave transistors

  • Architectures of wideband resistive and distributed power amplifiers

  • Architectures of high-frequency mixers

  • Architectures of non-linear active circuits controlled by cold HEMTs

  • Non-linear function analysis applied to controlled current source in transistors

  • High-efficiency operating classes – Current-voltage waveforms and load-lines

  • Architectures of high-efficiency narrow-band power amplifiers

  • Architectures of high-frequency oscillators

  • Non-linear distortions of modulated signals in power amplifiers.

Practical Works

  • PW1 Scalar Network Analysis to Measure Power Characteristics of a FET 

  • PW2 Vector Network Analysis For S parameter measurements and FET linear matching

  • PW3 Measurement and Simulation of I/V Characteristics of FETs. [S] Simulation of FETs

  • PW4 Simulation of a linear amplifier @ 2GHz using Keysight ADS and based on lumped components

  • PW5 Design of a linear amplifier @ 2GHz using Keysight ADS

  • PW6 Test and Measurement of your Designed linear amplifier @ 2GHz.

Scholars (indicative)

  • Design requirements of power amplifiers and  microwave front ends for radio communications

  • Design requirements of power amplifiers and  microwave front ends for satellite communications

  • Design requirements of power amplifiers and  microwave front ends for Radar applications 

Suggested Bibliography

  • Albert Malvino, David Bates, Electronic principles – Mac Graw Hill ISBN  978-0-07-337388-1

  • Pierre Muret, Fundamentals of electronics Electronic components and elementary functions – Wiley ISBN  978 -1-119-45340-6

  • John J Shynk, Mathematical Foundations of linear circuits and systems in engineering  – Wiley ISBN  978-1-119-07347-S

  • Steve Cripps, RF Power amplifiers for wireless communications –Artech House ISBN  0-89006-989-1

  • Andrei Grebennikov, RF and microwave power amplifier design –Mac Graw Hill ISBN  0-07-144493-9

  • P Colantonio, F Giannini, E Limiti , High efficiency RF and microwave solid state power amplifiers – Wiley ISBN  978-0-470-51300-2

  • Stephen A Mass, Non linear microwave and RF circuits – Artech House ISBN  1-58053-484-8

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (H)

  • Part I: Lecture (18H) Tutorial (15H)

  • Part II: Lecture (18H) Tutorial (15H)

  • Lab Sessions: 24H

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Exam ( lecture & tutorials)

    • Duration: 2 Hours

    • Weight: 75%

  • Exam – lab Sessions

    • Duration: 2 Hours

      Weight: 25%

Credit Units (ECTS): 9

Pre-requisites

  • Differential equation

  • telegrapher’s equations and solutions

  • Maxwell equations

  • electromagnetic boundary and interface conditions.

Module Aims

To provide students with an understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation applied to planar and volume passive components at microwave frequencies.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the microwave waveguides

  • Knowledge of EM fields in guiding and resonant microwave devices and knowledge of the technical tools for their design and measurement

  • Knowledge of methodologies for the design of planar and volume components at microwave frequencies

  • Knowledge of manipulation of specific software for electromagnetic simulation like ADS – Momentum and ANSYS-HFSS.

Indicative Content

  • Overall equations in waveguides

    • Maxwell Equations

    • Extraction of propagation equations

    • Interface conditions, boundary conditions

  • Properties of general solutions, dispersion diagram, guided wavelength, …

  • TE and TM wave mode: metallic rectangular and circular waveguide

  • TEM wave equivalence EM fields and current voltages

  • The solution of telegrapher’s equations in the transitional regime

  • Definition and properties of the coaxial line, microstrip and coplanar lines and stripline

  • S parameters and transmission line

  • N-ports microwave networks, Generalized scattering parameters

  • Vector Network Analyser, introduction to measurement

  • Smith chart and impedance matching
  • Passive components (L, C, R, LC) distributed and localized
  • Microwave resonator (planar, rectangular and circular cavities)

  • Conception method of microwave circuits

  • Theory of coupled lines, junction and couplers (hybrid, directional).

Practical Works

  • CAD with Momentum (Advanced Design System)

    • Microstrip elements: stub, half wavelength resonator, 2nd order filter

    • Microstrip inductance on multilayers

  • CAD with HFSS (Ansys Electromagnetics)

    • Microstrip and coplanar lines and striplines, coupled lines

    • Rectangular and circular waveguides and different loaded elements (short-circuit, dielectric slab, absorbing materials)

    • Parallelepipedal and cylindrical cavity (eigenmodes, selective excitations and coupled cavities)

    • Directional and hybrid couplers and use of CITIfile.

Scholars (indicative)

  • Synthesis and design requirements of microwave filters in the space domain  

  • New technologies for manufacturing components and microwave circuits

  • The evolution of microwave front-ends in the context of 5G and future telecommunications.

Suggested Bibliography

  • R.K. Mongia, I.J. Bahl, P Bharta and J. Hong, RF and Microwave Coupled-Line Circuits, Artech House, 2007

  • George L. Matthaei,  Microwave Filters, Impedance-matching Networks and Coupling Structures, Artech House, New edition 1980

  • Peter A. Rizzi, Microwave Engineering (Passive Circuits), Prentice Hall, 1988.

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (H)

  • Part I: Lecture (18H) Tutorial (15H)

  • Part II: Lecture (18H) Tutorial (15H)

  • Lab Sessions: 24H.

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Exam (lecture & tutorials)

    • Duration: 2 Hours

    • Weight: 75%

  • Exam – lab Sessions

    • Duration: 2 Hours

    • Weight: 25%.

Credit Units (ECTS): 9

Pre-requisites

  • Basic notions of electromagnetics (Maxwell equations and propagation equations; plane and spherical waves in homogeneous dielectrics…)

  • Light propagation basics

  • Basics on optical fibers (e.g. step-index fiber, graded-index fiber, numerical aperture, effective index, modal dispersion…)

  • Geometrical optics (optical rays, refractive index, Fermat principle, thin lenses, Snell-Descartes laws…)

  • Mathematical methods for physics and engineering (e.g. integrals, complex variables…)

  • Basic notions of quantum mechanics (e.g. particle/wave duality)

  • Basic principles on interferometry (e.g. two plane waves interferometry, Michelson and Fabry-Perot interferometers)

  • Light polarization and propagation in birefringent media.

 Course Aims

To provide students with a basic understanding of guided and Fourier optics as well as on fundamentals of lasers and optical amplifiers.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the main opto-geometric parameters of optical waveguides and characterise them.

  • Understand and explain the fundamental of light propagation in optical waveguides and optical fibers.

  • Understand the principle of light amplification and conceive some sample cases of optical amplification systems and laser oscillators with appropriate working point.

  • Understand light diffraction and the design of optical mounting schemes with lenses to control Gaussian Beams.
  • Establish a clear analogy with time domain signals: spatial frequencies

  • Understand and design spatial filters

  • Establish a clear connection with antennas and array of antennas illustrated in other modules of electromagnetics along with the Master programme.

 Indicative Content 

Part I: Linear propagation in optical waveguides 

  • Slab optical waveguide; definition and solution of the dispersion relation; propagation properties of guided and evanescent modes: effective index, fields

  • Optical fibre; Single-mode and multi-mode propagation; mode field approximation: Gaussian modes – Linearly polarized modes, modes orthogonality; Group velocity and group velocity dispersion in optical fibres; dispersion compensation; signal propagation with dispersion

  • Coupling losses; overlap integral; power transfer and injection efficiencies.

Part II Laser oscillators and amplifiers

  • Rare earth doped fibre amplifiers

  • Principles: mechanisms for light-matter interaction, rate equations, power equations for 3 level model, spectral behaviour, impact of the fibre geometry, fabrication of rare earth doped fibres

  • Erbium-doped fiber amplifier for telecoms: system parameters (gain, noise figure), limitations (e.g. excited state absorption)

  • Towards power amplification: other rare earths (ytterbium, thulium, holmium, neodymium), high-power lasers at 1 and 2 µm, applications: welding, micromachining

  • Lasers

  • Principles: laser gain for 3 and 4 energy level systems, small signal gain (2-level model), gain saturation

  • Laser oscillator: principle, loss, operating point

  • Characteristics of laser emission: power conversion efficiency, longitudinal modes, transverse modes

  • Laser resonators for single transverse mode operation: Gaussian beam, stability condition

  • Regimes: continuous wave, Q-switched, mode-locked)

  • Examples of all-solid lasers (bulk crystal lasers and fibre lasers) and their applications.

Part III Fourier Optics

  • From analogue signal processing in time domain to the foundations of spatial signal processing

  • Spatial frequencies; angular spectrum

  • Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction

  • Gaussian beams

  • Wave-optics analysis of coherent optical systems

  • Coherent optical information processing

Practical Works

  • Femtosecond fiber laser

  • Nd-YAG laser

  • Optical fibers:

    • fiber splicing, losses measurements and reflectometry

  • Optical fiber systems :

    • Fiber amplifiers

    • Digital transmission over fiber –Dispersion management

Scholars (indicative)

List of potential topics covered by guest lecturers.

  • Ultrafast and high-power lasers: extreme nonlinear optics

  • The thin disk laser

  • Coupled laser networks: long range dissipative coupling for real-time wave-front shaping and chaos synchronization with time-delayed coupling

  • Random lasers, chaotic cavities and complexity in multimode waveguides

  • New materials for photonics

  • Pushing the limits of large-scale optical instruments: VIRGO, LIGO

  • Laser Mégajoule

  • New functionalities in Integrated optics

  • Applications in biophotonics

  • Photonic metamaterials

  • Microwave photonics antennas and radars

  • Silicon photonics

  • Microwave photonics systems for airborne and space applications.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Eugene Hecht, Optics – Pearson 2016. ISBN-10: 0133977226

  • Joseph W Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics, W. H. Freeman 2017. ISBN-10: 1319119166

  • Luc Thevenaz et al., “Advanced Fiber Optics”, EPFL Press, Published April 4, 2011, Reference – 300 Pages, ISBN 9781439835173 – CAT# N10239

  • Liang Dong, Bryce Samson, “Fiber Lasers: Basics, Technology, and Applications”, 1st Edition, CRC Press, Published September 20, 2016, Reference – 324 Pages, ISBN 9781498725545 – CAT# K25782

  • Bahaa Saleh, “Fundamentals of Photonics”, 2nd Edition, Wiley-Interscience; 2 edition (March 9, 2007), ISBN-13: 978-0471358329.

 Methods of delivery & learning Hours (H)

  • Part I: Lecture (12H) Tutorial (8H)

  • Part II: Lecture (10H) Tutorial (10H)

  • Part III: Lecture (10H) Tutorial (10H)

  • Lab Sessions: 24H.

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Exam ( lecture & tutorials)

    • Duration: 2 Hours

    • Weight: 75%.

  • Exam – lab

    • Duration: 3 Hours

    • Weight: 25%.

Credit Units (ECTS): 9

Pre-requisites

  • Linear design of microwave amplifiers

  • Practice on Advance Design Simulator (ADS)

  • Basics of active and nonlinear microwave devices and circuits

Course Aims

To achieve the necessary skills to detect and solve stability problems in the design of microwave amplifiers, for both small and large-signal operation.

Learning Outcomes 

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • understand the origin, nature and types of circuit instabilities in microwave amplifiers in small and large-signal regimes.

  • use a CAD tool based on pole-zero identification to analyze the stability of the amplifier in an efficient way during the design stage.

Indicative Content & lectures

  • Harmonic Balance simulation of microwave circuits in large-signal operation.

  • Fundamentals of local stability.

  • Main stability analysis techniques.

  • Pole-zero identification applied to stability analysis.

  • Large-signal stability analysis using pole zero identification.

  • Stabilization networks.

Practical Works

  • PW1: Linear stability analysis of a small-signal amplifier.

  • PW2: Large-signal stability analysis of a multistage power amplifier (part 1 – Analysis)

  • PW3: Large-signal stability analysis of a multistage power amplifier (part 2 – Stabilization)

Suggested Bibliography

  • Microwave and RF Design of Wireless Systems, David M. Pozar, John Wiley & Sons, 2001

  • A. Suarez, Analysis and Design of Autonomous Microwave Circuits. New York: Wiley, 2009

  • A. Suarez, “Check the Stability: Stability Analysis Methods for Microwave Circuits,” IEEE Microw. Mag., vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 69 – 90, May 2015

  • STAN Tool: A Unique Solution for the Stability Analysis of RF & Microwave Circuits, AMCAD Engineering, White Paper

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (H)

  • Lecture/Tutorials (22H)

  • Lab Sessions: (08H).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam (lectures and lab activity)

  • Exam/Quiz (40%)

  • Laboratory activities and reports (60%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 3

Core courses (24 ECTS)

Pre-requisites

Basic knowledge of electromagnetic theory and differential calculus.

Module Aims

The course aims at teaching the fundamentals of antenna theory and design. The most common antennas for telecommunications are introduced and analyzed and practical guidelines for their design and use are given.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • understand the fundamentals of antenna theory,

  • design and use the most common antennas.

Indicative Content 

  • Maxwell’s equations and plane waves: integral and differential form of Maxwell’s equations, Helmholtz equation and plane waves, spherical waves, polarization of the electromagnetic field, radiation mechanism, Hertz dipole

  • Fundamental parameters of antennas: radiation pattern, field regions, directivity, gain, input impedance, effective area, Friis transmission equation, radar range equation

  • Small dipole and wire antennas: scalar and vector potentials, inhomogeneous wave equation, infinitesimal dipole, small dipole, finite length dipole, parameters of the half-wavelength dipole

  • Antenna arrays: antenna factor, broadside array, end-fire array, traveling wave antenna, mutual coupling between wire antennas, Yagi-Uda antenna

  • Microstrip and mobile communication antennas: rectangular and circular patches, feeding methods, planar inverted-F antenna, slot antenna, inverted-F antenna.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Balanis; Antenna theory: analysis and design; Wiley-Blackwell; ISBN: 9781118642061

  • Kraus, Marhefka; Antennas; McGraw-Hill; ISBN: 9780071232012

  • Someda; Electromagnetic waves; Taylor & Francis; ISBN: 9781420009545.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (60 Hours)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Mandatory written examination comprising theoretical questions and exercises on antenna analysis or design. After passing the written examination, the students can ask for an additional optional oral examination.

Credit Units (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

Basics of applied electromagnetism.

Learning Outcomes

Applications of microwaves (terrestrial and satellite communications, radar, remote sensing, wireless), system requirements for elements which must be analyzed and synthesized. Propagation modes (TEM, TE, TM, quasi-TEM), attenuation and dispersion of general waveguides. S-parameter matrix. Analysis of circuit components (impedance transformers, directional couplers, hybrids, circulators, filters).

Indicative Content

  • Introduction

    • Frequency bands in the electromagnetic spectrum

    • Microwaves and millimeter waves

    • Applications of microwave engineering to communication systems and sensing

    • Basic radar operation.

  • Transmission Lines

  • Waveguides

    • Modes of cylindrical structures and transmission lines

    • TEM, TE and TM modes. Parallel plate waveguide.

    • Rectangular waveguide

    • Planar waveguides (microstrip, stripline)

    • Power loss in metallic waveguides.

  • Microwave networks

    • Equivalent voltages and currents

    • N-ports microwave networks

    • Impedance and admittance matrices

    • The scattering matrix. Generalized scattering parameters

    • Lossless networks. Reciprocal networks

    • Measurements with a vector network analyzer.

  • Impedance matching

    • Quarter-wave transformer

    • The theory of small reflections and wide-band impedance matching networks

    • Binomial multisection matching transformers

    • Analysis of periodic structures.

  • Microwave resonators

    • Series and parallel resonances

    • Quality factor Q

    • Transmission line resonators

    • Rectangular waveguide cavities.

  • Microwave components

    • Series and parallel resonances

    • Quality factor Q

    • Transmission line resonators

    • Rectangular waveguide cavities.

Suggested Bibliography

  • D.M. Pozar, Microwave Engineering, Wiley, 2004

  • C.G. Someda, Electromagnetic Waves, CRC Press, 2006.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (60 Hours).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written and oral exam.

Credit Units (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

Basic notions of electromagnetic fields.

Module Aims

The course aims at teaching the theory and applications of optical devices for telecommunications.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • understand the fundamentals of optical communications systems

  • understand of nonlinear optics.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction to fiber optic communication systems

  • Basics of optical fibers: loss, dispersion, and nonlinearity

  • Numerical methods: Beam propagation method

  • The nonlinear optical susceptibility

  • Nonlinear optical interactions

  • Lasers

  • Semiconductor lasers

  • Optical receivers

  • Optical amplifiers

Suggested Bibliography

  • Robert Boyd, Nonlinear Optics, 3rd Edition, Academic Press, 2008.

  • Govind Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 5th Edition, Academic Press, 2012.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (60 Hours).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written and oral exam.

Credit Units (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

Basic notions of electromagnetic fields.

Module Aims

The course aims at teaching the theory and applications of all optical signal processing.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to understand the spatiotemporal dynamics of optical signals in communication systems and networks.

Indicative Content

  • Nonlinear waves in dispersive and/or diffractive media

  • Solitons

  • Modulation instability and breathers

  • Dispersive and diffractive optical shocks

  • Practical trainings

Suggested Bibliography

  • Robert Boyd, Nonlinear Optics, 3rd Edition, Academic Press, 2008.

  • Govind Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 5th Edition, Academic Press, 2012.

  • Miguel Onorato, Stefania Residori, Fabio Baronio, Rogue and shock waves in nonlinear dispersive media, Springer, 2016

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (30H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written and oral exams.

Credit Units (ECTS): 3

Pre-requisites

  • Basic concepts of solid-state physics (definition of a crystal, tight binding etc.)

  • Basic concepts of quantum mechanics (Hamiltonian, wavefunctions, operators etc.)

  • Maxwell’s equations, Coulomb and Lorentz forces

  • Vectors, matrices, divergence, and curl

Module Aims

The students will learn the fundamental electronic and optical properties of 2D quantum confined electrons, starting from the most significant findings in the field of graphene that eventually led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Calculate the linear band dispersion of graphene from tight binding

  • Understand and discuss the analogies between electrons in graphene and relativistic particles.

  • Understand and compare the quantum Hall effect, tunnelling, and the concept of effective mass for 2D electron gases with parabolic dispersion vs. Dirac fermions

  • Understand optical characterization methods based on absorption and Raman spectroscopy for monolayer and multi-layer graphene

Indicative Content

  • Section 1: Band structure and Hamiltonian of monolayer graphene
    • Crystals in 2D
    • Tight Binding of monolayer graphene
    • Graphene field effect devices
    • Dirac’s equation
  • Section 2: Dirac’s fermions
    • Anomalous quantum Hall effect
    • Klein tunnelling
    • Effective mass and massless fermions
  • Section 3: Optical properties
    • Phonons and Raman characterization
    • Absorption and visibility

Practical Works

Not applicable

Scholars (indicative)

Not applicable

Suggested Bibliography

  • M. I. Katsnelson, Graphene. Carbon in Two Dimensions
  • Journal articles will be provided during the course
  •  

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (H)

  • Lecture (24H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Written examination
    • Duration: 2 Hours
    • Weight: 100%

Credit Units (ECTS): 3

Elective courses (6 ECTS)

Pre-requisites

Basic knowledge of electromagnetism is recommended.

Module Aims

The course is aimed at those who wish to approach or broaden their knowledge of photonics and nanotechnology.

Learning Outcomes

We will cover all the fundamental aspects of light–matter interaction and provide a solid background to understand the properties of state-of-the-art nanotechnologies.
Particular attention will be given to the understanding of basic systems and Fourier Optics. We will then move to analyze metallic nanostructures, metamaterials, metasurfaces, and 2D materials and their applications.
The course will also provide the basics of numerical modelling of light-matter interaction in lenses and nanostructures.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction 
  • Ray Optics 
    • simple optical components (mirrors, planar boundaries, lenses, light guides);
    • graded index-optics (the ray equation, graded index optical components);
    • matrix optics (the ray transfer matrix, matrices of simple optical components, cascaded optical components, periodic systems);
  • Wave and Beam Optics 
    • monochromatic waves;
    • relation between ray optics and wave optics;
    • simple optical components;
    • interference;
    • polychromatic and pulsed light;
    • gaussian beams;
  • Fourier Optics 
    • propagation in free space
    • diffraction of light
    • image formation
  • Recap of light-matter interactions 
    • Maxwell’s equations in free space and in dielectric media
    • boundary conditions and constitutive relations
    • Wave equation
    • Poynting Theorem
    • Material properties: linear/nonlinear, homogeneous/inhomogeneous, isotropic/anisotropic, stationary/non-stationary, dispersive/non-dispersive
    • propagation in dispersive media: group velocity and group velocity dispersion
  • Polarization Optics 
    • polarization of light
    • reflection and refraction
    • anisotropic media
    • liquid crystals
    • polarization devices
  • Resonators 
    • planar resonators
    • two- and three-dimensional resonators
    • microresonators
  • Photonic Crystals 
  • Plasmonics 
  • Metamaterials 
  • Basics of numerical modeling of light-matter interaction (6h)
    • TMM
    • FDTD + BPM
  • Numerical laboratory 

Suggested Bibliography

Haus; Fundamentals and applications of nanophotonics; Woodhead Publishing; ISBN: 9781782424642;
Saleh, Teich; Fundamentals of Photonics; Wiley;

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (60 Hours).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written exam


Pre-requisites

Basic courses in chemistry and physics (electromagnetism). The experimental activity will be tailored by taking the individual background of the students into account.

Course Aims

The course aims at providing the students with useful chemical foundations that allow them to face with the world of nanostructured materials and devices, which is rapidly changing and characterized by a truly interdisciplinary nature. The lab experimental activity will lead the student to the nanofabrication and characterization of some nanodevices, with possible applications in the fields of energy conversion and storage, sensing and biosensing, smart data storage.

Learning Outcomes

The course aims at providing the students with useful chemical foundations that allow them to face with the world of nanostructured materials and devices, which is rapidly changing and characterized by a truly interdisciplinary nature. Through lectures, the student will learn the basic notions at a theoretical level, while through simple laboratory activities, the student will learn to manufacture and characterize some nanodevices

Indicative Content

  • Introduction. The chemical foundations of nanotechnology, chronological evolution and future challenges, peculiar properties at the nanoscales

  • Nanomaterials for (bio)photonics, diagnostics, electronics, energy conversion and storage

    • Plasmonic nanoparticles and nanostructures: What are plasmons? Optical properties of plasmonic NPs, synthesis of spherical NPs, synthesis of NPs with different shapes (nanorods, nanostars, nanocubes, hollow nanoparticles, core/shell NPs), synthesis and properties of nanoclusters, NPs applications for optical sensors, applications for Raman Spectroscopy (introduction to vibrational spectroscopies, Raman Spectroscopy and SERS effect), plasmonic heating applications, photothermal therapy, photocatalysis

    • Colloidal spheres and photonic crystals: structural colors, SiO2 nano and microparticles (synthesis and chemical properties), photonic crystals formation, applications in the field of optical sensors, photocatalysis and energy transition, Raman Spectroscopy (not-plasmonic SERS)

    • Soft matter: synthetic polymers (i.e. PDMS, chemical properties and applications), hydrogels based on natural polymers (i.e. alginate and chitosan), sustainable materials for sensors and large-area electronics

    • notes on Quantum dots (optical properties, influence of size and shape, synthesis, applications: imaging and photovoltaic cells)

    • notes on C-based nano-materials (carbon allotropes, focus on nanostructures: graphene, nanotubes and fullerenes, examples of applications)

  • Hands on: NanoLab Teamwork experiments on the synthesis of nanostructures and nanodevices on characterization of their functional properties

    • Bottom-up nanofabrication of nanostructures (nanoantennas, hybrid nanocomposites, soft photoactuators) and self-assembly

    • Surface engineering and stimuli-responsiveness

    • Experiments of optical and electrical sensing, smart data storage and photocatalysis

Suggested Bibliography

L. Cademartiri, G.A. Ozin, Concepts of Nanochemistry, Wiley, 2009 – Lecture notes, handouts, and scientific particles provided by the professor.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and laboratory activities (30 Hours).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Oral discussion on the experimental lab activity and selected scientific papers.

Credit Units (ECTS): 3

Pre-requisites

Basic knowledge of electromagnetics.

Module Aims

By means of laboratory exercises, the course aims at introducing students to the use of numerical tools and instruments which are essential for the design and test of WLAN antennas.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • design and simulate basic antennas by using CST Microwave Studio

  • measure the parameters of WLAN antennas by using a Vector Network Analyzer.

Indicative Content

  • Exercise 1: design and simulation of a monopole antenna.

  • Exercise 2: design and simulation of a patch antenna.

  • Exercise 3: experimental characterization of coaxial cables and antennas by means of a Vector Network Analyzer.

  • Exercise 4: indoor and outdoor measurement of the radiation pattern of high-directivity antennas.

Suggested Bibliography

Balanis; Antenna theory: analysis and design; Wiley-Blackwell; ISBN: 9781118642061

Methods of Delivery

Laboratory exercises (30 Hours). 

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Reports on the experimental exercises and oral exam.

Credit Units (ECTS): 3

University of Limoges

Core courses (27 ECTS)

Pre-requisites

  • Basics of nonlinear modelling of microwave transistors,

  • Basics of linear/nonlinear active microwave circuits,

  • Architectures of power amplifiers,

  • High-frequency measurements of linear/nonlinear components,

  • Basics of ADS software applied to linear circuits,

  • Basics of design methods for linear/nonlinear circuits of RF front ends,

  • Basics of sampling theory,

  • Basics of nonlinear modelling Volterra Series.

Module Aims

To provide students with an advanced insight into signal processing and adaptive linear/nonlinear microwave circuits to face high-frequency front-end requirements.

Learning Outcomes

  • Deep insight into the nonlinear modelling of thermal and trapping effects in microwave transistors to assess their impact on modulated signals

  • Advanced understanding of adaptive power amplifiers in high-frequency front-end illustrated by payload and radar applications

  • Design methods of Doherty, switching-mode and envelope tracking HPAs

  • Advanced understanding of band-pass sampling in a receiver for the satellite ground-based station

  • Advanced understanding of limitations of Software Defined Radio (quantification noise, phase jitter, non-linear effects, SFDR, THD).

 Indicative Content 

  • Nonlinear circuits

    • Specific nonlinear modelling methods of GaN HEMTs,

    • nonlinear modelling of thermal and trapping effects,

    • EVM/ACPR/NPR linearity criteria of HF modulated signals,

    • principles of linearization techniques,

    • system trade-offs between efficiency and linearity in payload satellites and radar systems,

    • statistics of complex modulated signals with variable envelope,

    • adaptive control of high power amplifiers, switching-mode power amplifiiers (F, inverse F, VMCD, CMCD),

    • Doherty technique,

    • EER Envelope Elimination and Restoration,

    • Discrete and continuous envelope tracking systems,

    • calculation of boost and buck DC-DC converters,

    • Envelope detector,

    • PWM modulation,

    • LINC and CHIREIX techniques.

  • Low noise amplifier design

    • Noise analysis for linear RF circuits (sources of noise in electronic circuits, noise power vs signal power, noise figure and equivalent noise temperature, noise figure for passive quadripole, Friss formula, noise parameters for linear quadripole, modelling noise in linear quadripole, characterization techniques, noise figure measurement),

    • design and synthesis of low noise amplifier (specifications and modelling process).

  • Digital processing systems

    • digital modulation formats,

    • signal processing (IQ formalism, complex envelope, IQ modulation and demodulation, example of M-QAM modulation format, mathematical description of sampling, Nyquist-Shannon theorem),

    • particular case of wireless systems (multiplexing techniques (FD/TDMA),

    • TDD and FDD duplexing with Downlink and Uplink, constraints on RF receivers),

    • receivers architectures, pros and cons (heterodyne vs homodyne, digital IF receiver, receiver with bandpass sampling, receiver with discrete sampling, limitation of analog-digital conversion, THD, SFDR, phase jitter).

  • Particular case of Track Hold Amplifier (THA) RF sampler

    • architecture of THA and non-linear phenomenological model of THA,

    • limitation of THA (bandwidth, SFDR, THD),

    • example of THA 1321 Inphi datasheet and its use for band-pass sampling with DDC (Digital Down Converter) processing for complex envelope extraction.

Scholars (indicative)

  • Design requirements of low noise and power amplifiers for microwave front ends dedicated to radio/satellite communications and radar systems.

  • Design requirements of Software Defined Radio for ground-based satellite receivers.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Steve Cripps , RF Power amplifiers for wireless communications –Artech House, ISBN  0-89006-989-1.

  • Stephen A Mass , Nonlinear microwave and RF circuits – Artech House ISBN  1-58053-484-8.

  • Jonathan C. Jensen , Ultra-high speed data converter building blocks in Si/SiGe HBT process, PhD thesis, 2005, University of California San Diego.

  • Richard Chi His Li, RF Circuit Design Wiley Online Library Second Edition, ISBN 20120928.

 Methods of Delivery

Learning Hours: Lectures

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam (Lecture)

  • Duration: 3 Hours

  • Weight: 100%

Examination period in December/January.

Resit in January and June.

Credit Units (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

  • Electromagnetic theory and basic microwave components

  • measurement microwave technics.

Module Aims

To provide students with an understanding of passive components for spatial and IoT telecommunications.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the electromagnetic and electric theory basis for microwave component design.

  • Know the methodologies for the advanced synthesis of microwave passive components and the potential of tunability of these components.

  • Design tunable components (MEMS switch, Phase Change Material, varactors …)  for active and passive planar circuits.

Indicative Content 

  • Propagation:

    • industrial and R&D context for passive microwave circuits,

    • propagation in cylindrical metallic waveguide,

    • EM analysis and modelling of heterogeneous microwave resonators,

    • theory of coupling between microwave resonators.

    • Microwave filter synthesis,

    • EM CAD for microwave sub-systems (components, packaging),

    • Current research activities on passive microwave components including their integration.

  • Integrated Passives for RFICs and MMWICs:

    • industrial and R&D context for RFICs, Low Power RF electronics,

    • parameters and characteristics for passive circuits and matching networks on CMOS RFICs,

    • integrated L-C networks,

    • design of layout-efficient matching networks in Silicon ICs,

    • Coupling EM simulations to circuit simulations,

    • tunable capacitors for adaptative front ends components, 

    • emerging IC integrated technologies: RF MEMS, PCM switches,

    • Application example.

Scholars (indicative)

  • smallsats, CubeSats, Nano and Picosatellites constellation for new  internet operators (GAFA),

  • MEMS and Phase Change Materials for 5G communications,

  • additive technologies to manufacture microwave components.

Suggested Bibliography

  • D. M. Pozar, Microwave Engineering, 4th edition, John Wiley and Sons, 2012.

  • Peter Rizzi,  Microwave Engineering: Passive Circuits, PHI Learning, 1987.

  • R. J. Cameron, C. M. Kudsia, R.R. Mansour, Microwave Filters for Communications Systems, Fundamentals, Design and Applications, Wiley, 2018.

 Methods of Delivery

  • Part I: Lecture & Tutorial 

  • Part II: Lecture & Tutorial

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam ( lecture & tutorials)

  • Duration: 2 Hours

  • Weight: 100%

Examination period in December/January.

Resit in January and June.

Credit Units (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

The basic tools of digital communications: Inter Symbol Interference, Binary Error Rate on an AWGN ideal channel, erf and erfc functions, digital filtering, Nyquist filtering, channel time and frequency selectivity…

Module Aims

The goal is to give the required basis to the students to understand the physical layer of modern high rate wireless transmission systems. The capacity of wireless links has dramatically increased in the last decade and this module gives to the students the main reasons why.

Learning Outcomes

After the module the students will be able to dimension a digital transmission system using performing transmit techniques such as the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

Indicative Content 

Characterization of propagation channels for high bit rate wireless digital communications, single-carrier systems (AWGN), filters at emitter and receiver sides, Nyquist criterion, equalization for single-carrier systems, shortcomings for 4G systems, introduction of multi-carriers modulations, description of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), synchronization, some examples (UMTS, LTE, WIFI-WIMAX).

Suggested Bibliography

JG Proakis Massoud Salehi, Digital Communications, fifth edition, Wiley.

Methods of Delivery

Lectures and Tutorials

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam ( lecture & tutorials)

Duration: 2 Hours
Weight: 100%
Examination period in December/January.

Credit Units (ECTS): 1.5

Pre-requisites

Understanding linear propagation in optical fibers (including role of chromatic dispersion in pulsed regime). Principles of laser emission in condensed matter. Construction of laser resonators. Knowledge of non-linear (cubic) interactions in optical fibers.

Course Aims

  • To explain how to detect light and how to characterize such light sources;

  • To explain how to tailor the relevant parameters of light sources;

  • To explain how the interplay between linear and non-linear effects in optical waveguides affects light propagation;

  • To explain how to tailor the relevant parameters of optical fibres.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to design a coherent light-emitting system based on optical fibres, taking linear and non-linear interactions into account in order to tailor the emitted beam according to some specific application. He will be able to analyse and characterize the spatial, temporal and spectral features of the emitted radiation. The student will also be able to use COMSOL.

Indicative Content

  • Basic skills: Detection (field modelling, space-time behaviour, how to measure phase, field and intensity correlation, relation between spatial and temporal behaviours), propagation (dispersion – diffraction, similarities for a 2nd order description, Gaussian beams and Gaussian pulses, space-time analogy, focus on light sources (relevant parameters for light source description, spatial and temporal modes, examples).

  • Advanced sources:

  1. How to manage the relevant parameters of a coherent source? Parameters for full space-time characterization of the laser radiation, M² parameter, autocorrelation trace, Fourier-limited pulses, diffraction-limited beams, tailoring a coherent radiation (spatial and frequency filtering, space-time analogy, space-time profiling), control of space-time characteristics by spatial light modulators.

  2. Spatial behaviour: guided wave optics – optical fibre (geometrical vs wave approach, techniques for controlling modal properties), index-guiding microstructured fibres (architecture, analogy with conventional fibres, modified total internal reflection, fabrication, properties), applications to high power sources, hollow-core fibers (bandgap and antiresonant fibers).

  3. Temporal behaviour: third-order nonlinearities and their impact on the pulse, management of third order nonlinearities for guided waves: microstructured fibres (index and bandgap guiding) vs conventional fibres, control over the propagation constant), single-frequency laser (gas laser, DBR, a few applications to LIDAR, LIGO-VIRGO), partially coherent radiation (evaluation of the mutual degree of coherence, incoherent supercontinuum and application to infrared spectromicroscopy), mode-locked lasers (principles, operation regimes (soliton, dispersion-managed, all-normal, chirped pulse), Raman solitons → application to multiphoton microscopy), frequency combs: coherent supercontinuum for metrology.

  4.  Labs: numerical design of complex, micro-structured, optical fibers with COMSOL multiphysics. Numerical modelling of pulse propagation in optical fibers with tailored nonlinearity and chromatic dispersion with Matlab.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Optics background

Eugene Hecht, Optics, fifth edition, Pearson (2016), ISBN 1292096934, 9781292096933, 728 pages

  • Fiber optics

– A. Ghatak, K. Thyagarajan, An Introduction to Fiber Optics, Cambridge University Press (1998), 565 pages
– G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 6th Edition, Academic Press (2019), 728 pages

Methods of Delivery

Lecture & Lab Sessions (CAD Matlab and Comsol Multiphysics) 

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam ( lecture & tutorials)

Duration: 3 Hours
Weight: 75%
Examination period in December/January.

Exam ( Lab sessions)

Duration: 1 Hours
Weight: 25%
Examination period in December/January.

Credit Units (ECTS): 7.5

Pre-requisites

  •  Maxwell’s equations, planes waves.

  • Equations of propagation

  • Resolution of linear systems

  • Antennas Parameters (Radiation and electrical characteristics, S parameters, Transmission Equation)

  • Antenna array analysis

  • Wire antennas, patch antennas, radiating apertures

Module Aims

  • EMC : Introduction to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) – How to solve EMC problems using analytic approaches based on physical phenomena or using numerical tools.

  • Antennas : Overview of antennas and array architectures for terrestrial and space communications and radar detection. Study of pattern synthesis techniques and tools. Antenna array and associated circuit design guidelines for beamforming. Analysis of the properties and design rules of radiating apertures and reflector antennas

Learning Outcomes

 On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the different ways of parasitic electromagnetic coupling

  • Evaluate the perturbation level in simple cases at the electronic systems level

  • Design an antenna array according to a given pattern specification

  • Design and to analyze the performances of most common radiating apertures and reflector antennas

 Indicative Content

  • EM compatibility

– Typical examples of EMC problem

– Introduction to diffraction problems, resolution using numerical tools

– Principle of an analytical approach based on circuit representation of physical phenomena

– Sources of electromagnetic interferences

– Coupling phenomena, particular case of transmission lines,

– Electromagnetic shielding and nonlinear protections

 

  • Antennas:

– Introduction on analog and digital beamforming architectures

– Linear and Planar Array Factor Synthesis (Fourier, Chebyshev, Numerical synthesis).

– Array beamforming networks

– Radiating apertures (horn antennas, slotted waveguide)

– Reflector antennas: properties and design.
 

Suggested Bibliography

 

  • “Analysis of multiconductor transmission lines”  Clayton R. Paul, IEEE Press, Wiley-Interscience A. John Wiley & sons, Inc, Publication. ISBN 978-0-470-13154-1

  • “La Compatibilité Électromagnétique des systèmes complexes » Olivier Maurice – Hermes-Lavoisier.

  • Randy L. Haupt – Antenna Arrays_ A Computational Approach (2010, Wiley-IEEE Press)

  • Constantine A. Balanis, ANTENNA THEORY ANALYSIS AND DESIGN, THIRD EDITION, A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., PUBLICATION.

  • Mailloux, Robert J, Phased Array Antenna Handbook, Third Edition,Artech House, 2017

Methods of Delivery

  • EMC : Lecture (10h)

  • Antennas : Lecture (15h) Tutorial (5h)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Exam( lecture & tutorials)

Duration: 2 Hours

Weight: 100%

Credit Units (ECTS): 7.5

Elective courses (3 ECTS)

Pre-requisites

  • General knowledge on Information and Communications technologies (ICT)

  • Basics on electronic devices and systems

  • Basics on semiconducting materials and devices

  • Mathematical methods for physics and engineering

Course Aims

To provide students with a basic understanding in the field of Energy Harvesting specifically applied to sustainable Internet of Things (IoT). The module aims at developing a general knowledge on various energy harvesting technologies that can be deployed to power autonomous sensors and/or objects in the field of IoT and industrial IoT. The module also aims at giving a general knowledge on ultra-low powerelectronics and energy management systems.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

  • Understand the context and challenges in the field of energy harvesting applied to IoT

  • Understand the main principles of operation of various energy conversion devices exploiting indoor light, thermal gradients, mechanical motions/vibrations, or ambient RF energy.

  • Understand the challenges associated with ultra-low power electronics and energy management in IoT systems

  • Establish a preliminary energy assessment of IoT systems in order to select the most suitable energy harvesting technology.

Indicative Content

  • Part 1: Energy Harvesting, power management circuits and ultra-low power electronics for the autonomy of electronic devices

  • Part 2: Indoor photovoltaics for IoT

  • Part 3: Power transfer by wireless technologies

  • Part 4: Ultra low power harvester and Management IC

  • Part 5: Thermal energy harvesting for IoT

Pratical Works

Some case studies can be proposed during the lectures, based on typical IoT devices or energy harvesters
Guest Lecturers (indicative).
Dr. Sébastien Boisseau (CEA LETI/DSYS) “Energy harvesting for autonomous electronic systems:
principles and opportunities”

Suggested Bibliography

  • M. Alhawari et al, “Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Wearable Devices”, Springer 2018, ISBN 978-3-319-62577-5

  • Y. K. Tan, “Energy Harvesting Autonomous Sensor Systems”, CRC Press, 2017, ISBN 978-1-351- 83256-4

Methods of Delivery

  • Introduction conference (3h)
  • Lectures (17h)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Case studies are proposed on each part (excluding on the introductive conference), based on the discussed concepts and technologies (from the lectures). In each case, either a report or an oral restitution is proposed.

  • Part 2: 1 short report or oral restitution (weight 25%)

  • Part 3: 1 short report or oral restitution (weight 25%)

  • Part 4: 1 short report or oral restitution (weight 25%)

  • Part 5: 1 short report or oral restitution (weight 25%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 03

Pre-requisites

  • Basic notions of 3D drawing

  • Basic notions on mechanical manufacturing

  • Basics basic notions of microwave components (from TU MPC)

  • Mathematical methods for physics and engineering (e.g. …)

Module Aims

To teach students a basic understanding of the production processes based on additive manufacturing technologies (metal, ceramic and plastic) and on heterogeneous integration of RF sub-systems using such 3D printing technologies.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to:

  • Understand the design rules related to each additive manufacturing technology

  • Understand the industrial issues related to the technology

  • Establish the positioning (advantages and disadvantages) of additive manufacturing compared to other manufacturing technologies

  • Establish the current and future RF components and subsystems in industrial production

Indicative Content

  • Part I: Basics on microwave domain (Lectures: 3h)

    • Microwave domain and additive manufacturing in RF front-end

    • Theory of transmission line

    • S-parameters

    • Waveguide and 3D resonators

    • Microwave filtering

  • Part II: Basics on additive manufacturing (Lectures: 3h)
    • Additive processes review

    • Digital chain for additive manufacturing

    • 3D printing hybridation for ceramic metal part dedicated to micro-electronic

  • Part III: Additive manufacturing on RF components (Lectures: 3h)

    • Different benefit from different materials: polymers, metals, ceramics Applications: antennas, filters, signal routing, metasurfaces and metamaterials etc…

    • Different technologies: 3D printing and conformal printing for microwave devices

    • Advanced materials: low-loss polymers, temperature stable metals and ceramics etc…

    • Future trends: 4D printing, submicron printing

Pratical works

  • Design on microwave filters (using HFSS software) – RF application notions (8h)

    • Simulation of microwave resonant cavities

    • How conductivity impact performances

    • Impact of dielectric/metallic perturbers on the resonant frequency

    • Synthesis of filtering functions

  • CAD design on real device (10h)

    • Digital mock-up creation with a parametric CAD software

    • 3D printing preparation

    • 3D printing (FDM or SLA printer preparation)

    • 3D geometrical control

  • VNA calibration, HF measurement and filter adjustment (3h)

    • Assembling, VNA calibration & connexion, measurement, fine tuning of the S parameters

  • Access to technological platform of IRCER & XLIM research labs.

Guest Lecturers (indicative)

List of potential topics covered by guest lecturers.

  • Professor Cristiano Tomassoni, Department of engineering – Electromagnetic fields, University of Perugia, Italy

  • Dr. Oscar Antonio Peverini, Senior Researcher at CNR-EIIIT, Italy

Suggested Bibliography

  • Gibson, D. Rosen, B. Stucker, M. Khorasani, “Additive Manufacturing Technologies”, 3rd Edition, Spinger, 2021

  • Claude Barlier et Alain Bernard, “Fabrication Additive”, Collection Technique et ingénierie, Edition Dunod, novembre 2020

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (h)

  • Part I: Lecture (3h)

  • Part II: Lecture (3h)

  • Part III: Lecture (3h)

  • Lab sessions: 21h

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Exam (about lecture & labs)

    • Duration: 1h30

    • Weight: 34%.

  • Report (article or poster type)

    • Weight: 66%.

Credit Units (ECTS): 03 ECTS

Pre-requisites

  • Basics notions of Electromagnetism

  • Basics on Lasers and interaction between laser and materials

  • Basics principles of Optical Fibers

  • Mathematical methods for physics and engineering (e.g. Electromagnetic waves )

Module Aims

To provide students with basic notions and understanding of biomaterials, bioimaging and
bioelectromagnetism.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Know the basics of cell biology and physiology to understand the phenomena and interactions that occur between living/materials and living/electromagnetic waves;

  • Understand, from this knowledge, diagnostic and/or treatment technologies implementing ceramic biomaterials, biomedical imaging or electromagnetic waves.

Indicative Content

  • Part I: Cell biology and physiology

    • Molecular basics: from DNA to proteins

    • Cell basics: cell structure (plasma membrane components and functions), organelles, compartmentalization

    • Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix communication: how signaling pathways control cell behavior at the interface with biomaterials from environmental stimuli?

    • Cellular biomechanics and cytoskeleton

  • Part II: Biomaterials

    • Effect of chemical elements (dissolution products) on bone cells and the associated molecular mechanisms

    • Influence of the modification of parameters featuring biomaterial surface properties on cellular behavior

    • Interaction proteins/material surface

  • Part III: Bioimaging

    • From epifluorescence to confocal laser scanning microscopy

    • Multiphoton and vibrational microscopy

    • Label and label-free imaging of biological cells/tissues

  • Part IV: Bioelectromagnetism

    • General view of bioelectromagnetism

    • Health risk assessment, dosimetry, specific absorption rate

    • Pulse electric field, dielectrophoresis, microfluidics

Lab sessions

  • Initiation to cell culture

  • Viability and proliferation tests and immunofluorescence assays

  • Study of cells on biomaterials by fluorescence microscopy

  • Specific absorption rate measurement

Scholars (indicative)

List of potential topics covered by guest lecturers.

  • “Calcium phosphates: from biominerals to biomaterials,” Christophe Drouet (CIRIMAT, CNRS, University of Toulouse, France)

  • “Applications of biomaterials in surgery,” hospital doctor (University Hospital of Limoges, France)

  • “Linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy techniques in (bio)materials,” Vincent Rodriguez (ISM, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, France)

  • “Visualizing living cells without staining and labeling: nonlinear Raman spectroscopic approach to life sciences,” Hideaki Kano (Kyushu University, Japan)

  • “Chemometrics in the framework of spectroscopic imaging,” Ludovic Duponchel (LASIR, CNRS, University of Lille, France)

Suggested Bibliography

  • Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regenerative Medicine,” Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials, 2020 (https://doi.org/10.1016/C2017-0-02138-9)

  • “Biomaterials Science – An Introduction to Materials in Medicine,” Academic Press, 2020 (https://doi.org/10.1016/C2017-0-02323-6)

  • “Bioimaging – Imaging by Light and Electromagnetics in Medicine and Biology,” CRC Press, 2020 (https://doi.org/10.1201/9780429260971)

Methods of delivery & learning Hours (h)

  • Part I: Lecture (8h)

  • Part II: Lecture (4.5h) Tutorial (1.5h)

  • Part III: Lecture (3h)

  • Part IV: Lecture (3h)

  • Lab sessions: 10h

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Written Exam (about lecture & tutorials & labs)

    • Duration: 2 Hours

    • Weight: 66%.

  • Oral Exam

    • Duration: 45 minutes

    • Weight: 34%.

Credit Units (ECTS): 03 ECTS

University of Brescia

Pre-requisites

  • Fourier transform,

  • basic Concepts of Probability and Random Variables,

  • basic concepts of linear algebra.

Module Aims

The aim of this course is the analysis of the principal error control coding techniques and digital modulation techniques used in the modern communication systems (WiFi, WiMax, Digital Power Lines, Terrestrial Digital Video Broadcasting, etc.).

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to understand the fundamentals of modulation systems and coding techniques.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction.

  • Modulation and demodulation for the AWGN channel

    • Characterization of signals and noise waveforms.

    • Modulation and demodulation for the Additive White Gaussian Noise channel (AWGN).

    • The optimal receiver for the AWGN channel.

    • Performance estimation. The Union bound. Examples.

  • Digital Modulation Systems (OFDM, CPM, DSSS)

    • Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM).

    • Transmitter and receiver.

    • Channel equalization in the frequency domain.

    • Effects of non-linearities.

    • Examples of applications of OFDM.

    • Continuos Phase Modulation techniques (CPM).

    • Full and partial respone CPM.

    • Optimal and symplified receivers.

    • Power spectrum estimation. Practical examples (GMSK, TFM, …).

    • Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) Modulation and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) techniques.

  • Block and Convolutional Linear Codes

    • Linear block codes.

    • The generation matrix and the parity check matrix. Cyclic codes. Hard and soft decision decoding. Performance evaluation. Burst error correction. Examples.

    • Convolutional codes.

    • Definition. Optimum decoding. The Viterbi algorithm. Performance evaluation. Classic concatenated codes. Examples.

  • Recent trends in channel coding

    • Turbo codes.

    • Low Density Parity Check codes. Examples.

  • Examples of modern communications systems

    • GSM, UMTS, LTE, xDSL, DPL, DAB, DVB, WiMax, WiFi, Software Radio, Cognitive Radio, MIMO Systems, UWB, RFID, Domotic Applications, Wireless communications in the Smart Cities, etc.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Simon Haykin, Communication Systems, 4th ed., Wiley, 2001.

  • J. G. Proakis, Digital Communications, McGraw-Hill.

  • S. Benedetto, E. Biglieri, Principles of Digital Transmission, Kluwer Academic-Plenum Publishers.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and examples (60H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination. Discussion of a project.

Credit Value (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

Knowledge of digital and analog electronics fundamentals is useful.

Module Aims

Learning design of (digital) embedded systems is a fundamental necessity for a telecommunication engineer. This course provides necessary instruments to achieve that goal.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to understand the fundamentals of digital systems and embedded systems programming.

Indicative Content

  • embedded systems introduction,

  • digital systems (combinatorial and sequential logic, finite state machine: HW and SW implementation). CMOS technology,

  • numerical representation. Fixed and floating point. Fractional numbers,

  • microprocessors, microcontrollers and DSPs,

  • memory devices. Cache memories,

  • embedded systems programming: assembler and C. Memory mapped I/O and Programmed I/O. Polling loop and interrupt handling,

  • local and remote model of I/O devices. Network topologies. RS232. SPI,

  • programming and debugging tools. Logic state,

  • PLD technologies and devices,

  • il VHDL – basic concepts,

  • il VHDL – FSM,

  • laboratory: the Microchip dsPIC33F and the ALtera FPGA Cyclone III with their IDEs.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Embedded Systems: A Contemporary Design Tool, J.K. Peckol, Wiley, ISBN: 978-0-471-72180-2.

  • The Scientist and Engineer’s Guide to Digital Signal Processing, S.W. Smith.

  • Mixed-Signal and DSP Design Techniques, edited by Walt Kester (Newnes, 2003).

  • Digital Logic and Microprocessor Design with VHDL, E.O. Hwang (Nelson, 2006).

Methods of Delivery

In the classroom lectures, the student will learn more about the hardware architecture aspects of GPP, ASIP and PLD, their internal building blocks, operation principles, interfacing with other digital systems etc. In the laboratory sessions, the student will learn more about the (low level) language programming of these devices, and how use them for actual implementing complex digital systems (e.g. Microchip dsPIC33F, Altera Cyclone III.). (60H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Course grading is based on a written test about the course topics (accounting for 70% of the final grade) and a lab test or creative lab project reporting and discussion (accounting for 30% of the final grade).

Credit Value (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

  • fundamentals of measurement theory,

  • circuit theory,

  • fundamental of electronics.

Module Aims

The course presents the fundamentals of methods, techniques, and instruments used both in the installation and for the maintenance of the telecommunication apparatuses.

Learning Outcomes

Introduction to techniques and instruments for characterization, testing and monitoring of telecommunication installations. The unit provides the student with the know-how which is required to correctly select and apply the right measurements techniques as well as to use the corresponding instruments indispensable to correctly operate a modern complex telecommunication installation. The techniques required by copper and fiber channels are introduced.

Indicative Content

  • Systems for the acquisition of measurements

    • What, when and why do we measure in telecommunications.

    • The measuring chain. Analog and digital signal processing in a measuring chain.

    • Signal and systems characterization.

    • Time-domain versus frequency-domain measurements.

    • The decibel scales.

  • Measurements in the frequency domain

    • the bank-of-filters spectrum analyzer,

    • FFT spectrum analyzer,

    • swept spectrum analyzer,

    • real-time bandwidth spectrum analyzers,

    • distortion measurements,

    • electronic noise measurements.

  • Measurements of optical quantities,

    • optical power measurements,

    • thermoelectrical power meters,

    • PIN photo-detectors,

    • electronic optical power meters,

    • insertion loss measurements on optical devices,

    • the optical spectrum analyzer,

    • the optical time-domain reflectometer.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Robert A. Witte, Spectrum & Network Measurement, Noble.

  • Dennis Derickson, Fiber Optic Test and Measurement, Prentice Hall.

  • Robert A. Witte, Electronic test instruments: Analog and Digital measurements, Prentice Hall.

Methods of Delivery

The course is organized as theory lessons and laboratory sessions. (30H).

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Oral Exam.

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Pre-requisites

Students should be confident in working with new concepts and ideas, besides mastering “basic” techniques developed in the previous three years of their engineering curriculum.

Module Aims

The course aims at teaching the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and nano-engineering.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to understand the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and of its applications in electronics and telecommunications.

Indicative Content

Nano-engineering: Basic principles.

  • The emergence of the nano-world: from “classical” to “quantum” mechanics.

    • the electron,

    • discrete energy levels,

    • wave function,

    • quantum observables,

    • quantum probabilities,

    • uncertainty relations,

    • the Schrödinger equation,

    • quantum superposition principle,

    • entanglement and non-locality (basics),

    • the photon,

    • quantum states of the electromagnetic field (basics),

    • quantum coherence & photon-atom interactions (basics),

    • quantum interference,

    • the spin,

    • the electron orbital & intrinsic (spin) angular momentum,

    • the proton spin,

    • manipulating the spin (basics),

 

  • Some Applications: Nanoelectronics, Spintronics and Nanophotonics.

    • low-dimensional Semiconductor Structures (basics.),

    • quantum wells,

    • nano-wires and quantum dots (basics),

    • single electron devices and electron tunneling devices,

    • photonic Band-Gap Materials,

    • light propagation at the nanoscale (basics),

    • nano-resonators,

    • photon confinement (basics),

    • tunable photonic band-gap mechanisms (basics),

    • taming the “quantum” to process information: “spin qubits” and “flying quibits”.

Suggested Bibliography

University Physics [Volume II Paperback] by Philip R. Kesten and David L. Tauck.

Methods of Delivery

Lectures, seminars and class discussion. (60H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written and/or oral examinations.

Credit Value (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites

Basic knowledge of optics and electromagnetics.

Module Aims

The course aims at teaching the physical fundamentals of optical and microwave remote sensing systems.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to understand the fundamentals of visible/NIR and microwave remote sensing tools.

Indicative Content

  • Radiometric quantities and thermal radiation:

    • regions of the electromagnetic spectrum,

    • diffraction,

    • radiometric quantities (radiance, irradiance, radiant exitance),

    • black body radiation, solar radiation,

    • interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter and atmosphere.

  • Visible and near infrared (NIR) remote sensing:

    • aerial photographic systems and their resolution,

    • scale of the formed image,

    • electro-optical systems (step-stare and push-broom imaging),

    • laser profiling.

  • Microwave remote sensing:

    • thermal noise,

    • radiometers and their applications,

    • radars and radar altimeters.

  • Platforms for remote sensing:

    • gravitational force and satellites,

    • orbits and ground-tracks,

    • geostationary and geosynchronous orbits.

Suggested Bibliography

Rees; Physical principles of remote sensing; Cambridge University Press; ISBN: 9781107004733.

Methods of Delivery

Lessons and tutorials (30H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Mandatory written examination comprising theoretical questions and exercises. After passing the written examination, the students can ask for an additional optional oral examination.

 

Credit Value (ECTS):3

Pre-requisites

No prerequisite, it is, however, preferable to have passed an exam of Digital Image Processing.

Module Aims

Students with a background in image processing will have the opportunity to deal with new types of visual data (multi- and hyperspectral data and 3D scanning datasets) and to learn, other than technologies which are specific for the remote sensing domain, also topics of current and more general relevance such as techniques for unsupervised and supervised classification of images or handling and processing of 3D data such as point clouds. Students with background and interests related to the elective application domains (environmental monitoring, terrain analysis…) will find accessible content and opportunity to enrich technical competence and awareness of the use of modern technologies for the analysis of data and images acquired by remote sensing equipment.

Learning Outcomes

This module introduces to a modern technological framework for processing and analysis of visual data from remotely sensed digital data.

Addressed topics include radiometric correction, geometric correction, atmospheric and ground effects, multispectral transforms, with a special focus of the course on machine learning and deep learning solutions for the classification and interpretation of multicomponent and hyperspectral image interpretation. Interdisciplinary applications in earth resource quantification and application of the acquired concepts to other imaging domains (e.g. biomedical).

Indicative Content

  • course Introduction,

  • image data error sources and correction,

  • sources of Radiometric Distortion and their Correction,

  • sources of Geometric Distortion and their Correction,

  • remote sensing image registration.

  • Multispectral Transforms for Image Data:

    • the principal components transform

    • other multispectral transformations.

  • Machine Learning:

    • the interpretation of remotely sensed images,

    • human assisted and machine learning approaches,

    • statistical (parametric) supervised image classification,

    • geometric (non-parametric) supervised image classification,

    • clustering and unsupervised classification,

    • introduction to Deep Learning and Convolutional Neural Networks for multicomponent image analysis.

  • Hyperspectral image analysis and interpretation. Laboratory of remote sensing 3D image acquisition and analysis.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis: An Introduction, John A. Richards Springer, 4th or 5th edition (2013).

  • Image Analysis, Classification, and Change Detection in Remote Sensing: With Algorithms for ENVI/IDL, Morton J. Canty, CRC Press, 2nd edition (2009)

  • Essential Image Processing and GIS for Remote Sensing, Jian Guo Liu, Philippa Mason, Wiley, 1st edition (2009).

Methods of Delivery

Lectures, laboratory exercises, visits to production companies, practical assignment to be done independently. (60H)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written exam, facultative oral exam and practical assignment assessment.

Credit Value (ECTS): 6

Pre-requisites
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Module Aims
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Learning Outcomes
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Indicative Content
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Suggested Bibliography
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Methods of Delivery
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic yearMethods
of Assessment and Weighting
The description will provided on the EMIMEP website before the beganning of the academic year
Credit Value (ECTS): 3

University of the Basque Country

Course aims

Control engineering deals with the modeling, analysis and change of the dynamics of different kinds of systems.  This course describes different control techniques, from simple to complex systems, including the control of distributed systems. Thus, the course provides an overview of the control field, including concepts such as feedback control, system stabilization, system monitoring and network-based control. The proposed application examples are oriented to radio frequency systems.

An open source tool, EPICS control systems, widely used in large scientific facilities, is used to monitor and control distributed systems.

The concepts are applied in a small practical project valid for the evaluation and grading of the students.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Design and implement simple model based control systems.

  • Design and implement simple controllers for RF systems.

  • Implement simple EPICS based projects for monitoring and control distributed systems.

  • Apply the main concepts related with distributed control systems to a small project using real hardware.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to feedback control systems,

  • Advanced control in RF applications: Stability and linearization of power amplifiers; LLRF control systems

  • Distributed control systems: Main characteristics of distributed systems, architectures for DCS systems, real-time, monitoring and supervision systems, SCADA,

  • Introduction to EPICS: Main characteristics of EPICS, distributed control system oriented to large scientific and industrial facilities: IOC controller, Channel Access and Database. Application Examples.

Suggested Bibliography

  • K. J. Aström, R. M. Murray, Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers, 2020. Link: https://fbswiki.org/wiki/index.php/Feedback_Systems:_An_Introduction_for_Scientists_and_Engineers

  • S. Simrock , Z. Geng, Low-Level Radio Frequency Systems, Springer, 2022.

  • Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Maarten van Steen, Distributed systems: principles and paradigms, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007.

  • Marty Kraimer et al, EPICS Application Developer’s Guide.

  • Jeffrey O. Hill, Ralph Lange , EPICS R3.14 Channel Access Reference Manual. 

Complementory Bibliography

  • Gero Mühl, Ludger Fiege, Peter Pietzuch, Distributed event-based systems, Springer-Verlag, 2006.

  • Fei-Yue Wang, Derong Liu , Networked Control Systems: Theory and Applications, Springer, 2008. 

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 15
  • Practical Works (H): 15

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Classroom activities: 30%

Laboratory activities and reports: 70%

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aims

Describe and review basic RF/microwave applications other than communications, including industrial and scientific facilities such as particle accelerators. Learn and develop practical experiments on measurement and controls of RF/microwave high power components.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to understand the fundamentals of instrumentation and control systems as applied in RF/microwave scientific and industrial facilities.

Indicative content

  • introduction to RF/microwave industrial and scientific facilities,

  • case study: Microwave ion sources fundamentals,

  • RF particle accelerators instrumentation and control,

  • RF-based sensing and diagnostics.

Suggested Bibliography

  • Wilson, E. (2001) An introduction to particle accelerators. Oxford University Press.

  • Wangler, T. (2008) RF linear accelerators. Wiley-VCH.

  • Brandt, D. (Ed.) (2009) CAS Beam Diagnostics. CERN-2009-005.

  • Brown, I. G. (Ed.) (2004) The Physics and Technology of Ion Sources 2nd Ed. Wiley-VCH.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 22

  • Tutorials (H): 4

  • Practical Works (H): 4

Methods of assessment:

Classroom activities (30%), Lab activities and reports (70%)

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aim

Providing students with knowledge and skills to allow them to tackle a project in designing a digital system, using programmable logic devices (PLDs) and the latest technologies of digital design with VHDL (Very-high-speed hardware description language).

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • present methods and tools for digital system design using current programmable logic technology, mainly field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices.

  • develop application specific systems for digital signal processing.

Indicative content

  • PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC: Internal architecture of current CPLD and FPGA devices. Programming Technologies: floating gate transistors, SRAM cells, anti-fuse elements, etc.

  • VHDL HARDWARE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE

    • An introduction to hardware description languages: VHDL and Verilog.

    • VHDL for synthesis: concurrent and sequential sentences. Components and systems.

  •  CAD DEVELOPMENT TOOLS

    • system description, simulation, synthesis, implementation, and device configuration.

    • Development of practical applications.

  • HARDWARE/SOFTWARE (HW/SW) SYSTEM DESIGN

    • heterogeneous HW/SW architectures,

    • system-on-chip (SOC) and embedded processors: hard-cores.

  • INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (IP) MODULES

    • IP modules design and in-system integration for real-time applications,

    • development of a case study.

Suggested bibliography

  • Fundamentals of DIGITAL LOGIC with VHDL Design, Stephen Brown and Zvonko Vranesic, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Education, 2009, ISBN: 978-0-07-352953-0.

  • FPGA-based Implementation of Signal Processing Systems, R. Woods, J. McAllister, Y. Yi, and G. Lightbody, 2nd Edition, J. Wiley and Sons, 2017, ISBN: 978-1-119-07795-4

  • DIGITAL SYSTEM DESIGN WITH FPGA. IMPLEMENTATION USING VERILOG AND VHDL, C. Ünsalan, and B. Tar, Mc Graw Hill Education, 2017, ISBN: 978-1-259-83790-6.

Laboratory Sessions:

  • Digilent, “Nexys A7 FPGA Board Reference Manual”, 2019. https://reference.digilentinc.com/programmable-logic/nexys-a7/start

  • Xilinx, “7 Series FPGAs Data Sheet: Overview. Product Specification”, DS180 (v2.6.1), 2020. https://www.xilinx.com/products/silicon-devices/fpga/artix-7.html

  • Xilinx, “Vivado Design Suite Tutorial. Design Flows Overview”, UG888 (v2020.1), 2020. https://www.xilinx.com/support/documentation/sw_manuals/xilinx2020_1/ug888-vivado-design-flows-overview-tutorial.pdf

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 10

  • Tutorials(H): 5

  • Practical Works (H): 15

Methods of assessment and Weighting

  • Laboratory and classroom work: 30%

  • Homework assignments: 30%

  • Final project: 40%

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aims

To understand the basics need of research valorization, its processes and pathways.

Learning Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Understand the main mechanisms for knowledge protection

  • Understand the processes for identifying and analysing the main channels for the uptake of research and innovation results

  • Understand effective and collaborative innovation management actions

  • Analysis of a use case

Indicative content

  • Introduction to protection strategies (IPR)

  • Introduction to patentability and technological vigilance

  • Introduction to the assessment of research results: definition of trial-concept, search for funding, search for partners

  • Introduction to the preparation, execution, and delivery of projects

Suggested Bibliography

  • Mario Biagioli, Peter Galison, “Scientific Authorship: Credit and Intellectual Property in Science “, Taylor & Francis.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 18

  • Practical Works (H): 12

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Classroom activities: 50%

  • Practice work and reports: 50%

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aims

This short course (3 ECTS) aims to give the students a meaningful introduction and hands-on experience of what data science is, to teach them how to continue to learn data science, and to give them the desire and skills needed to do so. The provided materials will perform as an index. For each topic, the aim is to give a cursory overview and a simple demonstration of what the topic under investigation is, and guide the students to bigger and better resources to really dive into it.

Learning Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Think statistically and perform data-driven research.

  • Design Python programs and exploit its data science modules.

  • Collect, clean and transform data in order to extract compact representations.

  • Perform Exploratory Data Analysis and visualize data and their relations in expressive and meaningful ways.

  • Apply Machine Learning techniques to estimate models relating different variables and magnitudes, in order to explain, classify and/or predict behaviours.

Indicative content

  • overview,

  • data collection, transformation, exploration and visualization,

  • machine learning for data modeling.

Suggested Bibliography

Data Science

  • Steven S. Skiena. The Data Science Design Manual. Springer, 2017.

  • Cathy O’Neil, Rachel Schutt. Doing Data Science. O’Reilly, 2014.

Data Science in Python

  • J. Van der Plas. Python Data Science Handbook (2nd Edition). O’Reilly, 2023.

  • Wes McKinney. Python for Data Analysis: Data Wrangling with Pandas, NumPy, and Jupyter (3rd Edition). O’Reilly, 2022.

Machine Learning

  • Christopher M. Bishop. « Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning ». Springer, 2006.

  • Kevin P. Murphy. Probabilistic Machine Learning: An Introduction. The MIT Press, 2022.

Machine Learning in Python

  • Aurélien Géron. Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn, Keras and TensorFlow (3rd Edition). O’Reilly, 2023.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 18

  • Practical Works (H): 12

Methods of Assessment and Weights

  • Final Exploratory Data Analysis and Machine Learning Project: 100%

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aims

To understand the basics of RF and microwave measurement techniques and systems. To acquire practice in using microwave equipment.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • understand the main figures of merit that are measurable in the circuits and sub-systems that form a wireless transceiver.

  • understand the principles of the modern RF and microwave measurements equipment.

  • work practically with basic equipment for RF and microwave measurements.

  • analyze and explain complex measurement set-ups for high frequency circuits

Indicative content

  • Review of circuit level and system level Figures of Merit.

  • Basic instruments: Power meters, Spectrum analyzers, Vector signal analyzers, Vector network analyzers, Non-linear vector network analyzers, Oscilloscopes and time-domain measurements, and Noise figure meters.

  • Modular instrumentation.

  • Measurement setups (IMD measurements, active and passive Load-Pull, Pulsed I-V, etc…). 

Suggested Bibliography

  • N. Borges, D. Schereurs, Microwave and Wireless Measurement Techniques, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

  • V. Teppati, A. Ferrero, M. Sayed, Modern RF and Microwave Measurement Techniques, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

  • R.J. Collier and A.D. Skinner (Ed.), Microwave Measurements, IET, 2007, London.

  • Exploring the Architectures of VNAs, Agilent Application Note 1287-2.

  • Applying Error Correction to Network Analyzer Measurements, Agilent Application Note 1287-3.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 20

  • Practical Works (H): 20

  • Seminars (H): 5

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course aims

Describe and review passive and active RF and Microwave devices intended to work under high power levels as it is the case in different applications, including industrial and scientific facilities such as particle accelerators. Learn and develop practical work on RF/microwave high power components.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to understand the basics of electronic devices, circuits and systems for power applications in RF and microwaves. 

Indicative content

  • RF and microwave power systems,

  • Passive and active components.

    • RF resonators and their applications. From the sub-millimeter to the meter. Applications ranging from communications to particle accelerators.

  • High power amplification devices.

Suggested Bibliography

  • R. E. Collin. Foundations for Microwave Engineering. IEEE Press, 2001.

  • J. C. Whitaker. The RF Transmission Systems Handbook. CRC Press, 2002.

  • I. A. Glover et al. Microwave devices, circuits and subsystems. Wiley, 2005.

  • John L. B. Walker. Handbook of RF and Microwave Power Amplifiers. Cambridge University Press., 2012.

  • Radio Frequency Engineering. CERN Accelerator School, CERN-2005-003.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 20

  • Lab sessions (H): 10

Methods of assessment and Weights

Exam/Quiz (40%), Lab reports (60%)

Credit Value (ECTS): 3

Course Aims

Introduction to the science and technology of sensors and sensors as part of measurement systems, with emphasis on microwave planar sensors.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • understand the basics of sensors and sensor systems at microwave frequencies.

  • apply knowledge of microwave sensor design for different applications.

Indicative content

  • Physical principles of sensors: Resistive sensors, inductive and capacitive sensors, piezoelectric sensors, optical sensors, sensors based on semiconductors, magnetic sensors, etc.

  • Microwave planar sensors

  • Wireless Sensors

  • Sensor Networks and Internet of Things (IoT).

Suggested Bibliography

  • Ferran Martín, Paris Vélez, Jonathan Muñoz-Enano, Lijuan Su, Planar Microwave Sensors, Wiley, 2022

  • J. Fraden, Handbook of Modern Sensors: Physics, Designs, and Applications. Springer 2010.

  • G. C. M. Meijer, Smart Sensor Systems. Wiley 2008.

  • W. Dargie, C. Poellabauer.  Fundamentals of Wireless Sensor Networks. Theory and Practice. Editorial Willey. 2010.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 20

  • lab sessions (H): 25

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Exam/Quiz (40%), Lab reports (60%)

Credit Value (ECTS): 4.5

Course aims

Software tools are today a key element for the analysis, simulation and design of any kind of systems, including RF and microwave or optics systems. In this course, the Matlab/Simulink and LabVIEW platforms are introduced. Matlab/Simulink are valid for the design and simulation of systems and for the analysis of obtained data. Indeed they include several specialized libraries/toolboxes that allow to speed up the process. On the other hand, LabVIEW platform is a very valuable tool for rapid prototyping, test and experimental validations of systems. It uses a graphical programming language that is tightly connected to the hardware. This allows fast experimental developments.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Design and implement simple Matlab scripts and Simulink models.

  • Interconnect Matlab and Simulink to enhance simulation processes.

  • Use Matlab toolboxes in her/his designs.

  • Design and implement control solutions in LabVIEW both in regular and real-time based hardware.

  • Control and integrate non-National Instruments devices into the LabVIEW based solutions.

Indicative content

  • Introduction to the model-based design. Use Case study: Design process of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole. Software tools for design, validation and testing.

  • Virtual instruments. Test, monitoring and control using LabVIEW. Rapid prototyping using virtual instruments.

  • Application examples. Examples of analysis and design using Matlab/Simulink. Examples of experimental test and monitoring systems using LabVIEW.

  • Use Matlab/LabVIEW to model and control a small testbech using real hardware.

Suggested Bibliography

  • K. J. Aström, R. M. Murray, Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers, 2009.

  • J. Essick, Hands-On Introduction to LabVIEW for Scientists and Engineers, Oxford Univ. Press, 2013.

  • Mathworks, Matlab Primer, http://www.mathworks.com/help/releases/R2014b/pdf_doc/matlab/getstart.pdf.

  • G. F. Franklin, J. D. Powell, A. Emami-Naeini , Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems , Pearson, 2013. 

  • National Instruments, LabVIEW, Control Design User Manual, http://www.ni.com/pdf/ manuals/371057f.pdf 
Web links of interest: 
- Matlab/Simulnk, http://www.mathworks.com – LabVIEW, http://www.ni.com. 

  • Web links of interest: Matlab/Simulnk, http://www.mathworks.com

  • LabVIEW, http://www.ni.com.

Methods of Delivery

  • Lectures (H): 15

  • Practical Works (H): 15

Mehods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Classroom activities: 30%

  • Laboratory activities and reports: 70%

Credit Value (ECTS): 3


Friedrich Schiller University Jena

Core Course (18 ECTS)

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

  • Carrying out scientific labwork in optics together with a research team

  • Preparation of a scientific report

  • Presentation of the results in a written report

Indicative Content

Internship in a research laboratory

Suggested Bibliography

Specifically defined by the instructor of the research team.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (540 Hours)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

  • Lab Work mark (100%).

  • Consists of a written report (approximately 20-30 pages) and a final presentation (15-25 minutes) with subsequent discussion

  • The final grade will be determined based on the research performance, the final report, and the presentation

Credit Units (ECTS): 18

Elective courses (12 ECTS)
The students will be guided by the local coordinator in the selection of the courses

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to give a comprehensive overview about active photonic devices such as switches or modulators. The course starts by a crisp introduction to the most important parameters and physical principles. The Lecture will then focus onto real-world devices including the areas of electro-optics, waveguides, acousto-optics, magneto-optics and non-linear optics. During this Lecture we will discuss the fundamental principles as well as devices currently employed in photonics. This Lecture will provide the students a base for their Master’s thesis.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction;

  • Electro-optical modulation;

  • Acousto-optical devices;

  • Magneto-optics and optical isolation;

  • Integrated lasers;

  • Non-Linear devices for light generation;

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

    • In-class studying (40 hours)

    • Independent studying (80 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

  • The course covers the fundamentals and concepts of the selected laser applications.

  • Learning to develop own solutions for challenges in laser applications

Indicative Content

  • Overview over laser beam applications as a contactless and remote probe (macroscopic and microscopic, cw and ultrafast, dealing with spectroscopy, metrology, sensing, and multidimensional microscopy)

  • Fundamental concepts of related physical and physico-chemical effects

  • Absorption and emission of light (selection rules)

  • Ultrafast coherent excitation and relaxation (linear and non-linear optical processes)

  • Light reflection and elastic/inelastic scattering

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Oral examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

In various selected topics out of the broad field of laser applications, the students should acquire knowledge of laser material interactions (e.g. atom cooling and optical tweezer), laser induced processes in gases, liquids, and matrices (incl. laser isotope separation), materials´ preparation and structuring by ablation, deposition and/or modification.

Indicative Content

  • Applied Laser Technology using the laser as a too Fundamental concepts of related physical and physico-chemical effects

  • microscopic and macroscopic light-materials-interactions material preparation and modification (with the exception of classical laser materials´ processing)

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)
The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No requirements

Learning Outcomes

The course aims at an introduction to various techniques used for computer based optical simulation. Therefore, the student should learn how to solve Maxwell’s equations in homogenous and inhomogeneous media rigorously as well as on different levels of approximation. The course concentrates predominantly on teaching numerical techniques that are useful in the field of micro- and nanooptics.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction to the problem – Maxwell’s equations and the wave equation;

  • Free space propagation techniques;

  • Beam propagation methods applied to problems in integrated optics;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to stratified media;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to spherical and cylindrical objects;

  • Multiple multipole technique;

  • Boundary integral method;

  • Finite-Difference Time-Domain method;

  • Finite Element Method;

  • Computation of the dispersion relation (band structure) of periodic media;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to gratings;

  • Other grating techniques;

  • Contemporary problems in computational photonics.

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

Fundamental knowledge on modern optics and condensed matter physics as well as basic knowledge of a computer programming language and computational physics

Learning Outcomes

The course aims at an introduction to various techniques used for computer based optical simulation. Therefore, the student should learn how to solve Maxwell’s equations in homogenous and inhomogeneous media rigorously as well as on different levels of approximation. The course concentrates predominantly on teaching numerical techniques that are useful in the field of micro- and nanooptics.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction to the problem – Maxwell’s equations and the wave equation;

  • Free space propagation techniques;

  • Beam propagation methods applied to problems in integrated optics;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to stratified media;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to spherical and cylindrical objects;

  • Multiple multipole technique;

  • Boundary integral method;

  • Finite-Difference Time-Domain method;

  • Finite Element Method;

  • Computation of the dispersion relation (band structure) of periodic media;

  • Mode expansion techniques applied to gratings;

  • Other grating techniques;

  • Contemporary problems in computational photonics.

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

This course covers the advanced principles of the development of optical systems.

Indicative Content

Starting from geometrical optics the imaging system will be described and optical aberrations will be discussed. Moving on to wave optics monochromatic waves will be taken as the basis for the description of coherent imaging. Combined with scattering theory in the 1st Born approximation a fundamental understanding of the possibilities and limitations in imaging is gained. The concept of the amplitude transfer function and McCutchens 3-dimensional pupil function are introduced. On this basis various coherent imaging modes are discussed including holographic approaches and their limitations, and optical coherent tomography. The working principles of light-detectors are discussed and the requirements for appropriate sampling of images. Finally various modes of fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution microscopy will be covered. The exercises will be calculating examples, also involving hands-on computer based modeling using Matlab and other tools.

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)

The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

This course gives an introduction in layout, performance analysis and optimization of optical systems with the software Zemax.

Indicative Content

  • Introduction and user interface;

  • Description and properties of optical systems;

  • Geometrical and wave optical aberrations;

  • Optimization;

  • Imaging simulation;

  • Introduction into illumination systems;

  • Correction of simple systems;

  • More advanced handling and correction methods.

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

Basic knowledge on modern optics and condensed matter physics.

Learning Outcomes

This course introduces properties of different types of optical fiber waveguides. Applications of optical fibers and optical sensing will be discussed.

Indicative Content

  • Properties of optical fibers;

  • Light propagation in optical fibers;

  • Technology and characterization techniques;

  • Special fiber types (photonic crystal fibers, hollow fibers, polarization maintaining fibers;

  • Fiber devices (e.g. fiber amplifiers and lasers);

  • Applications

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)
The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

The description will come soon.

Indicative Content

The lecture will cover a significant part of integrated quantum photonics, which is one of the pillars of the current quantum technology development. In particular, the lecture will cover the following topics

  • Integrated optics on a single photon level

  • Generation and manipulation of quantum states of light using integrated waveguides

  • Overview over integrated photonic platforms and fabrication of passive and active waveguide structures

  • Quantum walks in linear and non-linear waveguide lattices

  • Introduction to photonic quantum computation and simulation

  • Measurements using superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and transition edge sensors

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)
  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

The description will come soon.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

Understanding of the working principles of modern light microscopes and microscopic methods ranging from standard methods to modern super resolution techniques.

Indicative Content

  • Paraxial imaging and basic properties of optical systems;

  • Initial systems and structural modifications;

  • Chromatical correction;

  • Aspheres and freeform surfaces;

  • Optimization strategy and constraints;

  • Special correction features and methods;

  • Tolerancing and adjustment.

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No requirements

Learning Outcomes

In this course the student will learn about the fundamental fabrication technologies which are used in microoptics and nanooptics. This includes an overview of the physical principles of the different lithography techniques, thin film coating and etching technologies. After successful completion of the course the students should have a good overview and understanding of the common technologies used for the fabrication of optical micro- and nano-structures. They know their capabilities and limitations.

Indicative Content

  • demands of micro- and nano-optics on fabrication technology

  • basic optical effects of micro- and nano-structures and their description

  • typical structure geometries in micro- and nano-optics

  • coating technologies

  • lithography (photo-, laser-, electron-beam) and its basic physical principles

  • sputtering and dry etching

  • special technologies (melting, reflow, …)

  • applications and examples

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

  • In-class studying (45 hours)

  • Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination (100%)

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

Optical design is typically based on ray optics. It is discussed when the ray approach fails and a physical optics based concept can be used to tackle such situations. Moreover, physical optics provides very powerful concepts in system design, since the design tasks are formulated in terms of fields which enables access to all parameters of concern in design. Various examples from different applications are investigated to illustrate and demonstrate theoretical results

Indicative Content

  • Concept of physical optics modeling by field tracing
  • Geometric field tracing by smart rays.
  • Design as an inverse field propagation problem
  • System design in the functional embodiment
  • Design of lens systems for laser sources
  • Design of systems for light shaping by holographic optical elements and freeform surfaces
  • Inclusion of partially coherent and polychromatic light; multiplexing
  • Optimization of coatings and gratings in structure design
  • Applications in laser optics, wavefront engineering, and lighting

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)
The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

No official requirements

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to show how linear optics is applied for modeling and design of optical elements and systems. In the first part of the lecture we focus on ray-tracing techniques and its application through image formation. Then we combine the concepts with physical optics and obtain field tracing. It enables the propagation of vectorial harmonic fields through optical systems. In practical exercises the students will get an introduction to the use of commercial optics modeling and design software.

Indicative Content

  • Concepts of ray tracing

  • Modeling and design of lens systems

  • Image formation

  • Physical properties of lenses and lens materials in optical design

  • Image aberrations and methods to avoid them

  • Vectorial harmonic fields

  • Plane waves

  • Fourier transformation and spectrum of plane waves representation

  • Concepts of field tracing

  • Propagation techniques through homogeneous and isotropic media

  • Numerical properties of propagation techniques

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)
The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

Quantum Theory.

Learning Outcomes

The course will give a basic introduction into the usage of quantum states of light for the exchange of information. It will introduce contemporary methods for the generation of quantum light and schemes that leverage these states for the exchange of information, ranging from fundamental concepts and experiments to state of the art implementations for secure communication networks. The course will also give an outlook to aspects of Quantum metrology and imaging.

After active participation in the course, the students will be familiar with the basic concepts and phenomena of quantum information exchange and some aspects related to the practical implementation thereof. They will be able to apply their knowledge in the assessment and setup of experiments and devices for applications of quantum information processing.

Indicative Content

  • Basic introduction to quantum optics

  • Quantum light sources

  • Encoding, transmission and detection of information with quantum light

  • Quantum communication and cryptography

  • Quantum communication networks

  • Outlook on Quantum metrology and Quantum imaging

Suggested Bibliography

  • Grynberg, Aspect, and Fabre, Introduction to Quantum Optics, Cambridge University Press.

  • Boyd, Nonlinear Optics, Academic Press.

  • Kok & Lovett, Introduction to Optical Quantum Information Processing, Cambridge University Press.

  • Leuchs, Lectures on Quantum Information, Wiley-VCH.

  • Sergienko, Quantum Communications and Cryptograhy, CRC Press.

  • Ou & Jeff, Multi-Photon Quantum Interference, Springer.

Methods of Delivery

Workload (120 Hours)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written or oral examination (100%)
The form of the exam will be announced at the beginning of the semester.

Credit Units (ECTS): 4

Pre-requisites

Fundamental knowledge on modern optics and condensed matter physics

Learning Outcomes

This course aims to convey a fundamental understanding of the physics governing the optical and optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. First, the fundamental optical and optoelectronic properties of bulk semiconductors are reviewed, deepening and extending previously obtained knowledge in condensed matter physics. The students will then learn about the effects of quantum confinement in semiconductor systems in one, two or three spatial dimensions, as well as about photonic effects in nanostructured semiconductors. Finally, several relevant examples of semiconductor nanomaterial systems and their applications in photonics are discussed in detail. After successful completion of the course, the students should be capable of understanding present research directions and of solving basic problems within this field of research.

Indicative Content

The course will cover the following topics:

  • Review of fundamentals of semiconductors

  • Optical and optoelectronic properties of semiconductors

  • Effects of quantum confinement

  • Photonic effects in semiconductor nanomaterials

  • Physical implementations of semiconductor nanomaterials, including epitaxial structures, semiconductor quantum dots and quantum wires

  • Advanced topics of current research, including 2D semiconductors and hybrid nanosystems

Suggested Bibliography

A list of Literature and materials will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

Methods of Delivery

Work load (120 Hours)

In-class studying (45 hours)
Independent studying (75 hours) (incl. preparations for examination)

Methods of Assessment and Weighting

Written examination at the end of the semester and oral presentation on a current research topic

Credit Units (ECTS): 4